The French Eat Gnocchi?!?

In the Bouchon cookbook there is something called Parisian Gnocchi.  It didn’t shout “give me a try” as they had mustard and no potato in them so I moved along.  They were clearly not normal gnocchi.  But during my short stint at the restaurant I saw them making them, prepped the ingredients for somebody to make them the next day, and even got to try them so they are now forever added to my repertoire.  They are not your normal gnocchi in that they are actually påte á choux based with herbs, mustard, and cheese mixed in.  They get quickly poached and then finished with seasonal ingredients.  They are a bit of work but worth it!  Above are my not-so-even versions after their dunk in the simmering water.  Here’s a video of St Thomas doing it himself!

Tip: Make ahead and freeze after poaching!
Tip: You can measure ingredients out (even water and flour) ahead to save time later.  They do this in the real kitchens!

Herb Gnocchi (Bouchon Cookbook)

1 1/2 c water
12 tbsp unsalted butter
1 tbsp + 1 tsp salt
2 c flour
2 tbsp dijon mustard
3 tblsp herbs (I used fresh tarragon, prasley, and chives)
1 c grated Comté
5 – 6 large eggs

Combine 1 tsp salt with butter and water in a pot and bring to a simmer.  Add the flour at once and stir rapidly until glossy and the smell of cooked flour comes out.  In other words standard choux dough.  I put it in a mixer and started adding the eggs one at a time allowing each to fully incorporate.  You can interchange with the other ingredients and only add the 6th egg if the dough is stiff.

Put the lot into a pastry bag and let it sit for 30 minutes while you bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a simmer.  Push the dough out through a large nozzle lopping off equal lengths with a knife or kitchen scissors.  Try not to splash yourself.  They only need to cook for a few minutes until they float.  I dry them on towels and then arrange them on a tray that I can cover.  Alternatively you can move them to a freezer.

When it’s show time take half the recipe and divide into two hot large skillets with 1 Tbsp butter.  After they start to brown add your veggies, in this case two-three sliced and seeded squash that had been cooked already with some tomatoes and more fresh herbs.  Save the other half for another time!

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13 Comments

Filed under Bouchon, Cookbooks, Cooking, Food, Uncategorized

13 responses to “The French Eat Gnocchi?!?

  1. Oh! We love, love, love gnocchi! It’s a meal I often request Mike to make me on special occasions. I’ve never seen this kind of gnocchi before…and I love that I can freeze some. We also froze some pasta sauce with fresh cherry tomatoes and basil for winter time. You were my inspiration!

    • These are quite good. The mustard sounds weird but doesn’t come across overtly. My wife didn’t even know it was there. The herbs and cheese do though! So glad to hear you are freezing sauce, wonderful!

  2. That looks fantastic! I’ve never had the pate a choux gnocchi but I am certainly going to try them. Thanks Josh.

  3. Cool and unusual recipe – definitely for trying.

  4. Hmm, what an interesting take on gnocchi – the idea has got me thinking now – might have to give them a try.
    Have a happy weekend.
    🙂 Mandy

  5. I have been meaning to try gnocchi forever and now there is this new spin on it to look forward to too

  6. Anonymous

    I thought yeah, okay, yeah until that final picture. Then it was Oh Wow! Thanks for enlarging my cooking thoughts.

  7. Brilliant!! I love the picture! French do gnocchi? I would say quite well!

  8. Pingback: How do you make a $1000 dinner? | joshuafagans

  9. Pingback: Cookbooks | joshuafagans

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